A chicken salad sandwich sounds great for lunch, but the sandwich part is out of the question if you’re eating paleo. This recipe for a healthy alternative adds a fiber boost in the form of diced vegetables, like radishes and cabbage. If you pack along four or five large butter lettuce leaves, you can leave your fork at home and scoop up the chicken with them.
These apple chips are baked, not fried, so you’re already coming out on top compared to eating a bag of potato chips. Since you won’t be eating potatoes on Paleo it’s good to come up with a better alternative. These apple chips will have a sweetness to them, satisfying both your crunchy cravings as well as your sweet tooth. The best part is they only use two ingredients, apples and cinnamon, so there’s never any doubt as to whether these are healthy or not. Paleo isn’t very fruit centric, but you should be having at least one serving of fruit per day, and this can be it.

If you’re looking to cook Paleo like a pro, check out what Peter Servold serves up. Showcasing chef-driven, seasonal cuisine, Paleo by Season emphasizes fresh, local ingredients from your neighborhood farmers’ market. Preparing Servold’s simple yet delicious dishes will definitely sharpen your kitchen skills. And if you’re up for a challenge, you can try the advanced techniques designed to take your cooking to the next level.
Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.
Make-ahead meals work well in so many situations, especially for people who have busy households or simply don’t have much time for cooking. This particular cookbook takes advantage of that concept and directly applies it to paleo cooking. In it, the author offers 85+ different recipes, which are designed so that they can be easily frozen and reheated. Likewise, many of the recipes use a slow cooker, which can act as another way to save time.
This book features over 100 different Paleo recipes and if you don’t like a stuffy cookbook, this is the one to go with. It has a humorous style that will keep you smiling while you cook, and makes the process that much more fun. There is a whopping 288 pages for you to explore, so chances are you won’t be short on recipes for any type of meal you’d want to cook up. If you’ve ever wondered how to make your Paleo meals taste as good as possible, or how to maximize the effectiveness of the time you spend in the kitchen, you’ll be happy with the tips, tricks, and ideology of this Paleo chef.
You’ll be happy to learn that you can have Thai curry on the Paleo diet, as long as you follow a recipe that’s been adjusted accordingly. This may not follow the traditional recipe exactly, but all of the distinct flavors are there, thanks to the use of full-fat coconut milk. They’ve used plenty of chicken, and have included an assortment of vegetables like zucchini, carrots, mushrooms, and asparagus. There’s even kale thrown in for even more nutrients. Really as long as you’ve got the curry paste and the coconut milk you’re well on your way to a successful replication.

Here are more than 200 recipes you can have at your side as you venture into Paleo and determine what it is you’re supposed to be eating. You can expect leaner muscles while eating these meals, as well as more energy and more mental clarity, all without having to suffer through hunger pangs and cravings like you get with a diet. That’s because they remind you that Paleo isn’t really a diet at all, and with the sort of meals they have you making here you won’t feel like you’re missing out on anything. Quite the opposite, you’ll actually feel like you’re indulging.


These are sirloin rolls have brussel sprouts and fennel as sidekicks, but the sirloin is going to get top billing as the star of the show. Making sirloin rolls can be tricky unless you know how to do it, and they’ve provided helpful instructions here so yours will come out looking just like theirs. They have bacon rolled up with the sirloin, so you’re going to get plenty of flavor, and it’s nice that they have matched all of this meat with Brussels sprouts, one of the healthiest vegetables around.

A “good” lunch food is often defined by its ease of handling. That’s why sandwiches (and pizza slices) make popular midday meals. This recipe is every bit as easy to manage as a sandwich, and far more delicious than some cold meat stuffed between two slices of bread. Portabella mushrooms provide iron, magnesium, and zinc. Two slices of tomato and a few sweet potato chips could provide more than half the recommended intake of vitamin A — people 14 years old and older need an average of 700 to 900 micrograms a day.


If you want to try a Japanese-style burger without traveling to Japan, this is your ticket. They’re using organic grass-fed ground beef from Trader Joe’s, an excellent way to start off any burger recipe. From there they add onion, garlic, an egg, and some seasoning to get these just right. They then pan fry them, and they give the instruction of not squeezing them during the cooking process because they’ll end up dry. You can flip them as needed, but when it’s all said and done these retain their round shape. To make it even more Japanese themed you can use soy sauce during the cooking process.
These breakfast cups use two primary ingredients that are Paleo friendly: ham and eggs. They make a cup out of the ham so that the egg can rest inside of it. This means you are not getting any additional ingredients to muck things up, and they have kept it very simple. In fact there are only two other ingredients, and one of those is optional. You just add a bit of green onion, and if you feel like it you can put a bit of cheese on. They are using nitrate free ham, so you can tell that there is plenty of attention being given to using quality ingredients.
This flatbread pizza is billed as being grain free and nut free, which is interesting because many Paleo pizza crusts will contain almond flour to replace ordinary flour. This recipe uses sunflower seed flour, a very unique choice for a white flour substitute, and it combines that with tapioca flour to live up to the nut-free promise. You are free to add your own toppings, or go with what they’ve used, including fresh tomatoes, spinach leaves, and season things up with oregano, basil, and garlic powder. It’s nice to have a guilt-free delicious flatbread crust recipe to have on-hand anytime you get a pizza craving.
I have looked through many Paleo cookbooks and this one has become my favorite! Many paleo cook book recipes use a lot of expensive ingredients and are time consuming. This book os not like that. I have tried many of the recipes and they are delicious! Sometimes I do not have much time to spend in the kitchen and this book provides recipes for those who live very busy lives. I highly recommend this book!
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