The idea behind this cookbook is interesting. Basically, the author is relying on 15 key ingredients. With these, she offers 150 different recipes and a total of 450 variations. Now, this doesn’t mean that the book only uses 15 ingredients. Instead, those ingredients act as bases for the recipes and are expanded upon. So, you will still need some other ingredients.

One thing to mention is that the book does focus almost entirely on kid-type foods. This includes some meals and many finger foods. For many families, these probably wouldn’t be dishes that would serve the adults as well. Now, that may not be an issue. But, for people who want to cook a single meal for everybody or who are looking for kid-friendly dinners, the book may not be quite right.

The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
Meatloaf is one food you don’t have to give up while following the Paleo diet. The great thing about meatloaf is everyone usually likes it enough to make it a regular menu item. In this version it has been miniaturized so that you don’t end up making one big loaf, but rather individual-sized portions so that everyone gets a nice outer crust, and it avoids the problem of soggy or crustless middle section pieces. You’ll notice that the breadcrumbs have been done away with as they aren’t allowed on the Paleo diet. You won’t notice they’re gone because there’s coconut flour instead.

Make-ahead meals work well in so many situations, especially for people who have busy households or simply don’t have much time for cooking. This particular cookbook takes advantage of that concept and directly applies it to paleo cooking. In it, the author offers 85+ different recipes, which are designed so that they can be easily frozen and reheated. Likewise, many of the recipes use a slow cooker, which can act as another way to save time.

That’s all for now guys! I hope you enjoy the paleo recipes and they help you and your family eat better & live better. If you have any questions, please get in touch! If you have any other paleo recipe blogs that you think deserve to be on our list – please let me know. We’re working to make this the best page on the internet when it comes to paleo recipes! Stay paleo out there!
Here’s another paleo recipe that’s easy to put in a single-serving container and bring along for lunch. This slow-cooker preparation means you can pull everything together on a Sunday night and walk out the door with minimal lunch prep on Monday morning. Just throw some salad ingredients together and top it with your cooked barbacoa. You already know beef is a good source of protein; it also provides iron, zinc, and B vitamins.

Delicious smoothies--100% free of gluten, dairy, and refined sugar!Think Paleo and smoothies don't mix? Think again! Now, you can ...enjoy the quick burst of energy and nutrition that comes from the easy-to-make pre-/post-workout drink--without any of the gluten, dairy, or refined sugar! This cookbook shows you how to blend 150 Paleo smoothies right in your own home, so that you never have to worry about what else is in your drink. Whether you're interested in cleansing your body or just need an extra boost of energy after an intense workout, each section offers a delicious blend of all-natural fruits and vegetables that will keep you full throughout the day. Featuring step-by-step instructions and nutritional data, the recipes make a wide variety of tasty Paleo smoothies, including:Pineapple sunshine smoothieAcai boost smoothieVanilla coconut cream smoothieKale power smoothiePumpkin protein smoothieSweet apple pie smoothieYou don't have to give up the vitamin-packed smoothies you love just because you're on the Paleo diet--with Paleo Smoothies, you can have healthy, flavorful smoothies at every meal! read more
Paleo in 28 is designed to get people started with the paleo diet and it performs this role well. By relying on relatively few ingredients overall, this book means that you’re not forced to go out and buy a large number of ingredients all at once. There will still be some new ingredients if you’ve never tried paleo before but the nature of the book means that this shouldn’t overwhelming.
Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.
The recipes themselves cover many different types of dishes, including breakfast, drinks, snacks, desserts and, of course, main meals. With around 100 recipes in total, there is not a large number of recipes in any given category but that scarcely matters. Instead, the book acts as a great source of paleo recipes, regardless of your preferences for food.

In The Zenbelly Cookbook, Simone Miller draws on her experience as a chef and caterer to ease the transition to preparing Paleo meals. Besides great insider tips, from choosing the right knife to julienning a carrot, Miller provides a primer on ingredient measurements and an instructive breakdown of recipes. Her family-friendly recipes and refreshing menu ideas make creating a Paleo feast a breeze.

Ultimately, the best way to lose weight is to cut calories, eat a variety of nutritious foods, and exercise regularly. Some dietitians believe that a paleo diet, with limited carbohydrates and plenty of whole, nutritious foods, can be an effective part of a weight loss regimen. Always consult a physician to determine the best weight loss approach for you individually.


At its most basic, Paleo meal construction is in itself very simple. Simply fry, bake, stew or poach a nice piece of good quality meat, fish or seafood and then steam, bake or boil a side of fresh or frozen vegetables, making sure to add a good amount of tallow, butter, Ghee, lard, coconut oil or olive oil in the process for taste, energy and health. The process is similar for making delicious stews or omelets: choose your source of protein and your favorite vegetables and cook them in a fresh stock in the case of a stew or with eggs in the case of an omelet. Of course, on top of all this, onions are almost always welcome, as are fresh and dried spices. As you get used to playing more and more with the different flavors available to you, you’ll create amazing dishes without even thinking about it.
Though she  doesn't know it yet, Melissa and I are going to be best friends someday. She loves her spices, I love my spices. She's half Lebanese, I'm half Indian (close enough!). She's a badass former roller girl, I'm a roller girls spectator. She's a hilarious writer, I like to think that I'm a hilarious writer. Really though, I respect this woman so much and her book is genius. She not only dishes up bold flavors and paleo hacks, but the book is laid out in the exact way my brain works. She helps with meal planning, offers other additional suggestions for each recipe and leaves no question unanswered. My copy is covered in turmeric and coconut oil and I don't even care. Buy it here.
This is where it all begins. Well, for me it was actually Melissa and Dallas Hartwig's first book, It Starts With Food, but that's more of a nutrition book than a cookbook so it's not on this list. The Whole30 book is an upgrade from that, with even better meal planning and cooking resources. No doubt that the official Whole30 Cookbook, which was released in 2016, is also a good one to keep in your kitchen. I'd like to get my hands on that one soon. Buy it here.
I used to think that I could accomplish all my goals with food. If I ate a certain amount or a certain type of food, I could control everything. That worked for a while until my life started unraveling from ignoring the whole picture. Now I understand the importance of a balanced approach in all areas of life. These wellness articles will allow me to share all the aspects I share to create the life I love.
Chicken with Creamy Tomato Curry Simple Chicken with Winter Vegetables Grilled Coconut-Lime Chicken Tex-Mex Chicken Kabobs Chicken Korma With Cauliflower Rice Chicken Nuggets With Avocado-Cilantro Dip Orange, Chicken And Vegetable Stir-Fry Balsamic Chicken Drumsticks Chicken Caesar Burgers Chicken and Cranberry Stuffed Sweet Potatoes Grilled Pineapple Chicken Sweet Garlic Chicken Slow Cooker Queso Chicken Chili Slow Cooker Buffalo Chicken Meatballs Tuscan Chicken Skillet Cilantro And Lime Chicken BBQ Chicken Salad Coconut-Buttermilk Southwestern Grilled Chicken Honey-Mustard Drumsticks Spicy Sriracha Chicken Wings Buffalo Chicken Wraps Oven-Roasted Star Anise And Cinnamon Chicken Delicious Butter Chicken Recipe Creamy Chicken And Delicata Squash Baked Chicken Nuggets Guacamole Stuffed Chicken Coconut crusted chicken strips Olive, garlic and lemon chicken
Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.

Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.


The idea behind the paleo diet is that the human digestive system can handle these unprocessed foods much better than it can digest modern-day products like dairy, grains, and sugars. Many people stand by this diet as an effective method for weight loss, cleaning eating, and overall healthy living. Though, as with many fad diets, this can be restrictive since you don't eat dairy or whole grains, so you should consult with your doctor before trying this or any other extreme diet. 
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