I love doing round up recipe posts. Rarely do people go past 2 pages on the blog, and with 29 pages of recipes, that’s A LOT of recipes you are missing out on. So I’m here for you, to help you not forget about some of the easiest recipes on my blog. All you need is less than 40 minutes and BOOM, you have a weeknight meal. No need to complain about eating paleo when it’s this simple.
You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!”
Perhaps you know this by the French name mille-feuille, but it also goes by Napoleon. Following a traditional mille-feuille recipe will get you into trouble on Paleo because of all the puff pastry and pastry cream that is used. Here they’ve made a faux version, and they’ve made it Paleo friendly so you won’t have to feel bad about eating it. The puff pastry has been replaced with almond flour, so no concerns about wheat or grains, and the filling is made with no dairy, using only ingredients commonly found in Paleo cooking and baking recipes.

A paleo diet promotes high-protein recipes with responsibly raised, antibiotic- and hormone-free meats and poultry, and wild-caught, sustainably sourced seafood. Good fat comes in as a close second, with sources like nuts, seeds, coconut oil, avocado oil, and extra virgin olive oil as excellent choices. Vegetables are also key, as long as they're not too starchy. Avoid white potatoes, but most fresh veggies are fair game.
This meatloaf is billed as being packed with plenty of pork flavor, and that’s because they’re using bacon to top things off. What most people don’t understand is that Paleo is equal parts meat and vegetables, even though this meatloaf has a bacon topping, it is also packed with a pound of spinach. The 50/50 ratio of meat to vegetables is important to help your digestive system process all the meat, and to stick to a hunter-gatherer ratio. If it was a meat-centric diet it wouldn’t be very healthy, and it wouldn’t be in line with what our ancestors were eating in the Stone Age.
This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.
We're not entirely certain about the history of this classic recipe's name, but perhaps it has something to do with the spicy kick of the sauce. Our version is a shakshuka-like dish in which fiery harissa paste and heady spices slowly infused a rich tomato sauce where eggs gently poach. Look for jars of harissa with the Middle Eastern foods in your supermarket; you can substitute a half to full teaspoon of crushed red pepper in a pinch. The cook time for the eggs depends on the specific heat of your slow cooker. We offer a range of 15 to 20 minutes, so start checking at 15 minutes (or a couple minutes earlier) to ensure the eggs get done to your liking. 
This Paleo cookbook was written with nutrition and ease of cooking in mind, but never sacrifices any of the sumptuous flavor you e...xpect to find in Italian cuisine.The best things in life are simple. For instance: eat well to look and feel good! If you're eager to adopt a gluten free lifestyle or follow the Paleo diet, you'll find it very easy to do with the authentic and traditional Italian recipes in this book — each with a Paleo twist. Cookbook author and food blogger Cindy Barbieri (of the Cindy's Table blog) discovered that she didn't have to reject her love of authentic Italian food when she decided to adopt a Paleo approach to family dining. To her delight, she found that many of her favorite authentic Italian cuisine dishes were already Paleo. And those that aren't can be converted with a few simple and healthful substitutions-all without sacrificing the delicious flavors that she fell in love with as a child. Cindy's husband and kids enthusiastically embraced her gluten-free Italian soups, salads, appetizers, entrees, sides and desserts-and your family will too! In Paleo Italian Cooking, Cindy shows you how to prepare delicious family-style Paleo Italian meals, like: Flank Steak with Salsa Verde Chicken Scaloppine in Lemon-Caper Sauce Pistachio-Crusted Cod with Roasted Pepper Sauce Pan-Roasted Garlic-Sage Quail and over 85 other healthful dishes inspired by her grandmother's traditional Italian recipesLose weight and achieve better health without tedious calorie counting, purchasing expensive-but-bland diet foods or avoiding the foods you crave. Simply by avoiding grains, legumes and pasteurized dairy, you'll be able to look and feel better while indulging your passion for Italian cuisine! Indulge your passions for Italian cuisine and healthy eating at the same time with the 90+ "flavor first" recipes youAEll find in this Paleo Italian, gluten-free cookbook. read more
This is the worst cook book I have ever bought. Every recipe I have tried so far has had errors. It will either give a list of ingredients and then fail to tell you what to do with one of them or like the one i am cooking right now...it tells you to roast the chicken at 475 for 25 minutes and then reduce the temperature and continue to cook 45 minutes....ummmm what temp should a person reduce it to? Good thing I consider myself a good cook and know what a whole chicken bakes nicely at. But for some people this could be really frustrating and it is for me when I am in a hurry to make a meal for my family. Buyer beware. Im sure there are better Paleo cookbooks out there.
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