The recipes are hands down, amazing. Every Paleo foodie needs this book on their shelf. The skill level seems to range from simple to intermediate. There are some recipes that you can whip up for a weeknight meal and many others that you can impress dinner guests with. Many of the recipes are ethnic-inspired and they all burst with flavor. When reading this book, it feels like you are hanging out with Michelle and her family learning directly from them about how to eat like a real-food-foodie!
A key selling point of The Healing Kitchen is that it goes beyond the basic paleo diet. Instead, the authors also focus on providing information and inspiration about cooking for people with a chronic illness or autoimmune diseases. This approach is powerful for anybody who focuses on food as medicine, especially as the meals we eat can play a large role in our health.
Not a cookbook in the traditional sense, Eat the Yolks is a compelling treatise on the power of the Paleo diet and the misinformation perpetrated by the food industry. Author Liz Wolfe draws on her background as a certified Nutritional Therapy Practitioner to take an in-depth look at the function of protein, fats, carbohydrates and cholesterol in the human diet. Her witty and relatable writing makes Eat the Yolks the perfect read for a plane ride or gym workout — or to pass along to a friend who’s on the fence about going Paleo.
This cookbook is a little franker than most, which isn’t that obvious from the cover. In particular, you’ll find the odd expletive in place and much of the writing is more conversational than other cookbooks. To me, this makes for a fun book, especially as it also has many stunning photos of the food that you’ll be making. But, some people simply don’t like the approach.
One thing to mention is that the book does focus almost entirely on kid-type foods. This includes some meals and many finger foods. For many families, these probably wouldn’t be dishes that would serve the adults as well. Now, that may not be an issue. But, for people who want to cook a single meal for everybody or who are looking for kid-friendly dinners, the book may not be quite right.
When I first stumbled across his site, I remember telling you all that his recipes were for the man's man. They are also incredibly useful for the gal whose husband is getting sick of salads and things that don't fill him up, like myself! I lack a lot of hearty dinner recipes on my site, and especially lack  grilling recipes – all of which George is the master of. My list of desserts and snacks far outweighed the savory list, so I'm working on beefing that up for you for the cookbook! George can also can sling a pretty mean Paleo baked good though, so this book is a one stop shop. Oh and he loves all things bacon so you can't lose.
So about the recipe… You have to buy the Paleo wraps online or if you’re from my area (Mandeville, Louisiana), my friend at Vive sells them. I’m not always a huge fan of buying Paleo products, but 1) these are only made of coconut, so they’re super healthy and 2) these are SO good and will give you so many new options for lunch. After you buy the wraps, make the chicken salad and use a Paleo mayo recipe. Do not get lazy about the Paleo mayo and buy store-bought; the Paleo mayo is much better. Mayo can be tough if you don’t follow directions. Happy lunch-making! Share with me in the comments your opinion on this recipe. 
Bangers and mash is a classic English dish, but you don’t have to indulge in potatoes to enjoy some delicious mash. Sweet potatoes, or, as in this recipe, parsnip, is also perfect. Of course, this meal is higher in carbs than most Paleo preparations, but from a natural source and in a reasonable quantity, it shouldn’t be any problem. This meal is especially great as an after workout meal or when you need some quick energy for the rest of your day. This recipe serves about 6 people.
With Paleo it is important to use the proper amount of spices and seasonings so that you don’t get tired of just eating meat and vegetables all the time. In this recipe they have an interesting mix of spices, and use plenty of lime so you’ll get a citrusy, spicy flavor. It starts off with chicken thighs and breasts, and then coats it all in olive oil so the spices will stick to the meat better. They’re using coriander, cumin, garlic powder, black pepper, red pepper flakes, and sea salt so this is definitely not lacking in the flavor department.
Paleo in 28 is designed to get people started with the paleo diet and it performs this role well. By relying on relatively few ingredients overall, this book means that you’re not forced to go out and buy a large number of ingredients all at once. There will still be some new ingredients if you’ve never tried paleo before but the nature of the book means that this shouldn’t overwhelming.
This meatloaf is billed as being packed with plenty of pork flavor, and that’s because they’re using bacon to top things off. What most people don’t understand is that Paleo is equal parts meat and vegetables, even though this meatloaf has a bacon topping, it is also packed with a pound of spinach. The 50/50 ratio of meat to vegetables is important to help your digestive system process all the meat, and to stick to a hunter-gatherer ratio. If it was a meat-centric diet it wouldn’t be very healthy, and it wouldn’t be in line with what our ancestors were eating in the Stone Age.
Eating Paleo is as hard or easy as having the right recipes to follow. Go into it alone and try to figure it out solo, and you’ll probably crash and burn. Go into it armed with an arsenal of delicious recipes already planned out for you, and in accordance with the Paleo guidelines of what to eat and what not to eat, and your chances of success improve dramatically. Here are the Top 10 Paleo Diet Cookbooks on the planet, so you can get the junk out of your life and start eating real, actual, food.
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