1. One Pan Balsamic Chicken and Veggies: This super healthy and nutritious meal features chicken breasts and the veggies of your choice, all topped with a delicious balsamic and Italian dressing. Pro tip: As with all of these recipes, make sure to wait until you’re ready to eat before you add any glazes or dressings on top. (via Chelsea’s Messy Apron)
Creamy Cucumber And Chive Salad Cucumber And Mango Salad Roasted Sweet Potato Salad With Lime Dressing Vietnamese-Style Beef And Mango Salad Cranberry And Clementine Salad Greek Salad Strawberry Broccoli Salad Chopped Salad with Shrimp and Curry Dressing Cranberry Avocado Salad Green Salad With Clementine Dressing Strawberry Pecan Salad Tomato And Spinach Salad Coleslaw With Apples and Poppy Seeds Broccoli and Apple Salad with Walnuts Radish and Cucumber Salad Chorizo And Roasted Potato Salad Creamy Cucumber Salad Strawberry Poppy Seed Salad Citrus and Avocado Salad Chicken Salad With Almond Dressing Fruity Sweet Potato Salad Avocado, Apple And Chicken Salad Chicken Cranberry Salad Fruit Salad With Lemon Dressing Cucumber And Carrot Salad Raw kale salad Raspberry and spinach salad Bacon, grape & broccoli salad
**Frozen desserts that even a caveman would love! **We all scream for ice cream…even those of us with dietary restrictions. The Pa...leo or Primal lifestyle doesn’t have to be restrictive any longer, as there are now a host of dairy-free dessert options to satisfy your sweet tooth. Using nut milks, natural sugars, and no artificial additives, these recipes mimic the same creamy texture and sweet taste of regular ice cream. With full-color photographs and easy-to-follow, step-by-step instructions, delicious frozen treats like these can be whipped up in a flash:Salted Caramel Crack Ice CreamBulletproof Coffee AffogatoVanilla Cherry SorbetWatermelon Lime GranitaFrozen Chocolate Cream PieThe Paleo-style of eating seems to be here to stay. This cookbook takes it to another level. read more
Kelly is such a talented photographer. Her book makes me want to eat the food right off the page. Equally as good as the photography are her recipes. Kelly incorporates chocolate into each recipe so thoughtfully that we cooked from it all week and didn’t feel chocolated-out! The book is packed with delicious recipes for treats, but it also has a handful of savory recipes with a chocolate twist. If you enjoy chocolate even half as much as I do, then this book is a must-have!
Even though these have been dubbed “finger lickin’” Colonel Sanders has nothing to do with these. That’s because they’re not made with chicken, but with beef. They pack a bit of a kick because of the chipotles used, but not so much that it overpowers the other ingredients. There are plenty of Paleo ingredients used, both in the meatballs, and in the sauce. You’ll find tasty items like coriander seed, garlic, paprika, and bay leaves. You’ll find that the Paleo diet is not very restrictive, it’s just a matter of finding the right mix of spices and seasonings to make the food taste as good as it can.
As the name suggests, this paleo cookbook specifically targets people who are training while also on the paleo diet. This could include many different groups of people, including those who participate in sports, bodybuilders and individuals who simply want to increase their muscle mass. The overall style works well, especially for people who are already interested in performance but are new to paleo.
But, that being said, the one book that we do strongly recommend is Practical Paleo. This book is particularly valuable because it offers so much information all in one place. As a result, it is a powerful guide to beginning paleo and being successful with the diet approach. At the same time, there is a decent number of recipes on offer as well, so you’re not missing out in that area.
Here’s another paleo recipe that’s easy to put in a single-serving container and bring along for lunch. This slow-cooker preparation means you can pull everything together on a Sunday night and walk out the door with minimal lunch prep on Monday morning. Just throw some salad ingredients together and top it with your cooked barbacoa. You already know beef is a good source of protein; it also provides iron, zinc, and B vitamins.

I'm a guy, carnivore and amateur cook . I love meat so going Paleo isn't a great stretch for me, but I'm always looking for ways to bump up the flavor and elevate my cooking. What I like about this cookbook is that the recipes are easy to follow. But what I LOVE is the diversity of different cooking styles and meats used. The author takes you on a world wide trip of flavor and introduces you to proteins most people would be nervous to try to cook or eat. While you have your normal proteins such as beef, pork, chicken and lamb, you also get an intro to frog legs, gator, bison, buffalo, venison, elk, etc. Take a walk on the wide side and let your inner Captain Caveman taste buds scream in joy with these tasty and healthy recipes. Good Eats.
Bring pizza back on the menu with this recipe that could win an award. It’s made with rhubarb, which if you’re like us you didn’t know much about it before going Paleo. But it’s a very useful item to have around, and it’s used in plenty of recipes. Here they’ve paired it with chipotle powder so you’re going to get a pizza topped with ingredients you probably wouldn’t have considered before. They use goat cheese, which helps to avoid the use of cheese made from cow’s milk, and this is something you may or may not be able to digest well, so use your own judgement on it.
This is an easy way to musakhan, and if you don’t know how to make this traditional dish, this is a great place to start. It uses plenty of chicken thighs, so you’ll be all set in the protein department. It also contains plenty of spices like allspice, cloves, and saffron. You’ll be getting a few onions in this, but you may want to eat a salad with it because there are not a lot of vegetables being used, and you want to create a nice balance between all that chicken and your vegetable intake. Don’t be afraid to try new recipes on Paleo, trial and error is how our species made it this far.

Eggs are an excellent foundation for paleo breakfasts. Over easy, scrambled, poached, baked, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, made into an omelet—you name it. You can also experiment with paleo pancakes, using protein powder, coconut flour, or almond flour in lieu of white flour (tip: add baking soda and vinegar for a fluffier outcome). Chia puddings, sweet potato "toast," and paleo-friendly smoothies are also fair game.


I think liver and onions are secretly best friends and the combination even has the potential to make someone love liver. The caramelized onions are very simple to prepare and this recipe doesn’t need anything else to be a complete meal. Liver by itself is so full of nutrients that it could be considered Mother Nature’s multi-vitamin. I enjoyed liver and onions for ages before I learned that the combination is actually a classic in many European countries and is enjoyed all over the world. The ingredient list really couldn’t be shorter.
The one thing to note is that the complexity of the recipes is somewhat divisive. Some people feel that the recipes are simple and easy to follow, while others find them overly complicated. As is often the case, reality is somewhere in the middle. By paleo standards, the recipes aren’t too bad, especially given you need a good balance of macros to maximize performance. Nevertheless, if you are new to paleo, the recipes may seem a little confusing at first, although you would get used to them.
For those who know that eating right is the most important thing to get right in a day, this is the book. It takes you on a tour across the various options that you have in a day to manage your diet. The best thing to do in such scenarios would be to keep what you can in a daily diet and eliminate others that cause unnecessary bulk in the body. But not everyone can manage to buy fancy stuff from the market and hence it provides some very simple everyday solutions for you to follow. If you go through the book, you will find many examples of food items that benefit you but don’t cost a fortune to include in your diet.
The Big Book of Paleo Slow Cooking: 200 Nourishing Recipes That Cook Carefree, for Everyday Dinners and Weekend Feasts contains a variety of recipes—everything from quick, easy weeknight meals to more complicated dishes to prepare on weekends or holidays. The meals incorporate international flavors, all while using common ingredients. There’s also a pantry stocking section that will help you stock up on paleo-approved ingredients.
The reason why we gave this book a number 3 position on our rating lies in its very fundamentals. On one hand, while it is great for those wanting taste back in their diets, it does nothing to lead you further into the advanced levels. It is more like an everyday approach for the daily follower who is looking for sustainability and not performance endurance. If you want a daily dose of paleo then this is your stop, but if you want something to give you a performance boost then there are better options for you.
At first, the title may seem like a paradox – chocolate and Paleo don’t always go hand in hand, but this book is a compilation of 80 mostly-healthy dessert recipes that are grain and dairy free. Certainly, any kind of treat should not be a daily indulgence, but for special occasions and gatherings, the recipe in The Paleo Chocolate Lovers Cookbook look delicious. I made the chocolate cupcakes with cookie dough frosting for a party recently and they were definitely a hit. Other recipes include:
When Chef and caterer Anna Conrad was asked to provide paleo recipes for a fitness group’s 28-day paleo challenge, she was a littl...e skeptical. Could an athlete-or even an average person-really maintain a balanced body without any grains or dairy? Before agreeing to the job, she decided to follow the diet for two weeks to see how she felt. In that short amount of time, she lost eight pounds without feeling hungry or deprived, and her blood pressure, heart rate, and cholesterol all stayed within healthy limits. She gladly provided the recipes and now offers a paleo menu as a regular part of her catering business.But what about bread? How can you make bread without grains? In this book, Conrad teaches how to make wholesome and satisfying breads with almond flour, coconut flour, and a host of other delicious, non-grain flours. Recipes include:Almond Sandwich BreadCoconut Sandwich BreadRosemary and Olive Oil BreadSweet Potato Rosemary FocacciaSavory Bacon and Scallion MuffinsMolasses Brown BreadAnd many more!From sweet breads to sandwich breads, Italian favorites to Swedish delights, this book has something for every bread lover.Skyhorse Publishing, along with our Good Books and Arcade imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of cookbooks, including books on juicing, grilling, baking, frying, home brewing and winemaking, slow cookers, and cast iron cooking. We’ve been successful with books on gluten-free cooking, vegetarian and vegan cooking, paleo, raw foods, and more. Our list includes French cooking, Swedish cooking, Austrian and German cooking, Cajun cooking, as well as books on jerky, canning and preserving, peanut butter, meatballs, oil and vinegar, bone broth, and more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home. read more
The Paleolithic Diet, also known as the Paleo Diet or the Caveman Diet, is one that includes eating the foods that were consumed b...y those living during the Paleolithic times some 10,000 years ago.The concept behind the Paleo Diet rests on the hypothesis that our bodies are genetically and evolutionary designed to survive and thrive on the foods that were available to our early Paleolithic ancestors.The main foods within the Paleo Diet are meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, roots and nuts. There are no grains, legumes, dairy products, salt, refined sugar or processed oils because this type of eating took place before the development of agriculture.The Paleo Diet was very first made popular in the 1970s by Walter L. Voegtlin, and has since been revised and recreated by numerous authors and researchers throughout several books.In this book you will find more than 100 mouth-watering meal recipes for Paleo Diet. read more
One thing to mention is that the book does focus almost entirely on kid-type foods. This includes some meals and many finger foods. For many families, these probably wouldn’t be dishes that would serve the adults as well. Now, that may not be an issue. But, for people who want to cook a single meal for everybody or who are looking for kid-friendly dinners, the book may not be quite right.
At its most basic, Paleo meal construction is in itself very simple. Simply fry, bake, stew or poach a nice piece of good quality meat, fish or seafood and then steam, bake or boil a side of fresh or frozen vegetables, making sure to add a good amount of tallow, butter, Ghee, lard, coconut oil or olive oil in the process for taste, energy and health. The process is similar for making delicious stews or omelets: choose your source of protein and your favorite vegetables and cook them in a fresh stock in the case of a stew or with eggs in the case of an omelet. Of course, on top of all this, onions are almost always welcome, as are fresh and dried spices. As you get used to playing more and more with the different flavors available to you, you’ll create amazing dishes without even thinking about it.
These tiny tacos are served up on jicama shells. The rest of the ingredients are placed in the slow cooker until the meat is just right. That means you can pop it in a few hours before the big game, and serve them up when everyone has arrived. They are billed as being great sports food, because they are smaller than a traditional taco, so they’re mini sized and good for serving. But they still have plenty of flavor thanks to all of the cilantro, garlic, lines, and oregano. The jicama shells really help to avoid the use of a flour tortilla.
Fruit is a popular choice for a dessert when eating the Paleo way because it’s naturally sweet, and will provide you with a serving of fruit that you should be getting each day. It’s easy enough to doctor up the fruit with some naturally sweet things like honey or coconut sugar, and in this recipe they’ve taken peaches, grilled them to unlock the flavor, and then topped them with coconut cream. This means you’re getting a sweet, flavorful, creamy dessert without any dairy, or any refined sugar. Walnuts are added to the top for a crunchy addition that also adds healthy fat.
i didn't buy this, my wife did. but she doesn't rate anything and it will stay here until i do. I do like eating like a caveman, don't you. I mean they used a lot of truffle oil and eggs, high quality meat and of course real butter, none of that yucky margarine. Cavemen eat better than i am used to eating. Only the best, i don't know how they afforded it at the grocery store in paleolithic days but it probably only cost a couple of clams, right? we all watched the Flintstones.
×