Making a pizza crust from cauliflower is something you just have to try if you haven’t yet. You’ll be surprised that a vegetable can double as a pizza crust, and even more surprised to learn that it actually tastes good. This pizza makes use of bacon, so it has an unfair advantage on your taste buds. There’s also spinach as a topping, so you’re definitely covered in the vegetable department. Coconut flour helps the cauliflower turn out like a pizza crust, so you won’t be focused on that while you’re eating and you can focus on the bacon.

Don't let your dietary restrictions get in the way of a great party. With "Gather: The Art of Paleo Entertaining," authors Haley Mason and Bill Staley show how to impress uninitiated guests with a multicultural Paleo menu. Dishes like Costillitas (Cuban-style baby back ribs) and General Tso's Chicken are perfect for large family get-togethers, while the recipes can be scaled back to a party of two. Organized by season to ensure the freshest ingredients, the book also offers tips on pulling off an elegant holiday feast.

Bring pizza back on the menu with this recipe that could win an award. It’s made with rhubarb, which if you’re like us you didn’t know much about it before going Paleo. But it’s a very useful item to have around, and it’s used in plenty of recipes. Here they’ve paired it with chipotle powder so you’re going to get a pizza topped with ingredients you probably wouldn’t have considered before. They use goat cheese, which helps to avoid the use of cheese made from cow’s milk, and this is something you may or may not be able to digest well, so use your own judgement on it.


These tiny tacos are served up on jicama shells. The rest of the ingredients are placed in the slow cooker until the meat is just right. That means you can pop it in a few hours before the big game, and serve them up when everyone has arrived. They are billed as being great sports food, because they are smaller than a traditional taco, so they’re mini sized and good for serving. But they still have plenty of flavor thanks to all of the cilantro, garlic, lines, and oregano. The jicama shells really help to avoid the use of a flour tortilla.
The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
×